Categorie: Documents (pagina 1 van 2)

The 2019 Multidimensional Poverty Report

The MPI provides a comprehensive and in-depth picture of global poverty – in all its dimensions – and monitors progress towards Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 1 – to end poverty in all its forms. It also provides policymakers with the data to respond to the call of Target 1.2, which is to ‘reduce at least by half the proportion of men, women, and children of all ages living in poverty in all its dimensions according to national definition.’

The publication “Illuminating Inequalities” previews ongoing research into trends over time for a group of countries including Bangladesh, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, Haiti, India, Nigeria, Pakistan, and Peru. SDG target 10.1 calls for tracking the progress of the bottom 40 percent of the population compared with that of the total population – the publication includes case studies and a detailed analysis of the growth of those furthest behind – the ‘bottom 40%’.

Read the report

International Labour Conference ends with Declaration on the Future of Work

“Considering that the experience of the past century has confirmed that the continuous and concerted action of governments and representatives of employers and workers is essential to the achievement of social justice, democracy and the promotion of universal and lasting peace;

…”

Read the Declaration

 

Social and Solidarity Economy

To mark the 100th anniversary of the International Labour Organization (ILO), the Belgian NGO Solsoc and the CETRI wanted to question the social and soli-darity economy (SSE), which is at the heart of its strategy to promote Decent Work. In effect, various studies have highlighted the SSE as the best tool for promoting Decent Work. The ILO shares the view that “the social and solidarity economy contributes to the four dimensions of the ILO’s overall objective of Decent Work”.But how can we ensure that the SSE is the driving force behind the spread of Decent Work and its four pillars, namely job creation, the right to work, social protection and social dialogue ? How can it both “create a movement” and connect with other social movements, including trade unions and women’s movements ? Under what conditions can it not only help meet needs, but also represent a transformative power and, beyond that, an alternative to the economic model ? These questions, strategies and challenges are examined here on the basis of analyses, expertise and experience from the South, by giving a voice to organisations, health mutuals, trade unions and Solsoc’s partners, who are all actors in this transformation and alternative on a daily basis.

Read this new publication

In-work poverty in Europe

A new Synthesis Report produced by the European Social Policy Network (ESPN) puts forward several recommendations and calls for more effective policy action at European and national levels to tackle in-work poverty.

Countries that depend on commodities

The number of countries that depend on commodities has reached its highest level in 20 years, says a new UNCTAD report.

UNCTAD defines a country as dependent on commodities when these account for more than 60% of its total merchandise exports in value terms.

The State of Commodity Dependence Report 2019 shows commodity-dependent countries increased from 92 between 1998 and 2002 to 102 between 2013 and 2017.

More than half of the world’s countries (102 out of 189) and two thirds of developing countries are dependent on commodities, the report indicates.

“Given that commodity dependence often negatively impacts a country’s economic development, it is important and urgent to reduce it to make faster progress towards at( meeting the sustainable development goals,” UNCTAD Secretary-General Mukhisa Kituyi said.

 

Social Protection Floors: new data

More than half of the world’s population lacks access to essential health care and just 29 per cent have comprehensive social security coverage, according to a new International Labour Organization (ILO) report on the implementation of social protection in more than 100 countries.

Globally, only 68 per cent of persons of retirement age receive some form of pension, and in many low-income countries this drops to just 20 per cent. Fewer than 60 per cent of countries reported that they had schemes or benefits to ensure income security for children.

The findings come in the General Survey 2019 , compiled by the ILO Committee of Experts on the Application of Conventions and Recommendations (CEACR). The Survey (published under the title Universal social protection for human dignity, social justice and sustainable development) focuses on the ILO’s Social Protection Floors Recommendation, 2012 (No. 202)

Read the report

European Minimum Income: Final Report

The European Minimum Income Network (EMIN) presented its latest report in the European Parliament on Tuesday 19 February, at an event hosted by Jean Lambert MEP, Greens, with the participation of Georgi Pirinski MEP, Social and Democrats and Enrique Calvet Chambon MEP, ALDE, and Katalin Szatmari, European Commission.

The Report outlines key activities and developments in relation to Minimum Income in Europe in the period 2017-2018 as well as recommendations coming from the work of EMIN in this period.

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Illicit Financial Flows to and from Developing Countries

The always fascinating reports from GFI!

For 2015 this report finds:

The top quintile (30) of countries, ranked by dollar value of illicit outflows, includes resource rich countries such as South Africa ($10.2 billion) and Nigeria ($8.3) but also European countries including Turkey ($8.4 billion), Hungary ($6.5 billion) and Poland ($3.1 billion) as well as Latin American nations Mexico ($42.9 billion), Brazil ($12.2 billion), Colombia ($7.4 billion) and Chile ($4.1 billion). Asian states in the top 30 countries of this category include Malaysia ($33.7 billion), India ($9.8 billion), Bangladesh ($5.9 billion) and the Philippines ($5.1 billion)...

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State of power 2019

As every year TNI’s excellent ‘State of Power’ report, 2019:

The ILO published its ‘Future of Work’ Report

New forces are transforming the world of work. The transitions involved call for decisive action.
Countless opportunities lie ahead to improve the quality of working lives, expand choice, close the gender gap, reverse the damages wreaked by global inequality, and much more. Yet none of this will happen by itself.
Without decisive action we will be heading into a world that widens existing inequalities and uncertainties.

Expanding youth populations in some parts of the world and ageing populations in others may place pressure on labour markets and social security systems, yet in these shifts lie new possibilities to afford care and inclusive, active societies.
We need to seize the opportunities presented by these transformative changes to create a brighter future and deliver economic security,
equal opportunity and social justice – and ultimately reinforce the fabric of our societies.

Seizing the moment: Reinvigorating the social contract
Forging this new path requires committed action on the part of governments as well as employers’ and workers’ organizations. They need to
reinvigorate the social contract that gives working people a just share of economic progress, respect for their rights and protection against
risk in return for their continuing contribution to the economy. Social dialogue can play a key role in ensuring the relevance of this contract
to managing the changes under way when all the actors in the world of work participate fully, including the many millions of workers who
are currently excluded.

Read the full report

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